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    Rethinking the concepts of “local or global processors”: evidence from Williams syndrome, Down syndrome, and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    D'Souza, Dean and Booth, R. and Connolly, Monica and Happé, F. and Karmiloff-Smith, Annette (2016) Rethinking the concepts of “local or global processors”: evidence from Williams syndrome, Down syndrome, and Autism Spectrum Disorders. Developmental Science 19 (3), pp. 452-468. ISSN 1363-755x.

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    Abstract

    Both Williams syndrome (WS) and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) have been characterised as preferentially processing local information, whereas in Down syndrome (DS) the reported tendency is to process stimuli globally. We designed a cross-syndrome, cross-task comparison to reveal similarities and differences in local/global processing in these disorders. Our in-depth study compared local/global processing across modalities (auditory-verbal/visuo-spatial) and levels of processing (high/low) in the three syndromes. Despite claims in the literature, participants with ASD or WS failed to show a consistent local processing bias, while those with DS failed to show a reliable global processing bias. Depending on the nature of the stimuli and the task, both local and global processing biases were evident in all three neurodevelopmental disorders. These findings indicate that individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders cannot simply be characterised as local or global processors.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    Additional Information: This is the accepted version of the article which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/desc.12312.
    Keyword(s) / Subject(s): Autism Spectrum Disorder, Down syndrome, local/global processing, Weak Central Coherence, Williams syndrome
    School: Birkbeck Schools and Departments > School of Science > Psychological Sciences
    Research Centre: Brain and Cognitive Development, Centre for (CBCD)
    Depositing User: Annette Karmiloff Smith
    Date Deposited: 28 May 2015 09:08
    Last Modified: 02 Dec 2016 11:50
    URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/11885

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