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    Video game experience and its influence on visual attention parameters: an investigation using the framework of the Theory of Visual Attention (TVA)

    Schubert, T. and Finke, K. and Redel, P. and Kluckow, S. and Muller, Hermann J. and Strobach, T. (2015) Video game experience and its influence on visual attention parameters: an investigation using the framework of the Theory of Visual Attention (TVA). Acta Psychologica 157 , pp. 200-214. ISSN 0001-6918.

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    Abstract

    Experts with video game experience, in contrast to non-experienced persons, are superior in multiple domains of visual attention. However, it is an open question which basic aspects of attention underlie this superiority. We approached this question using the framework of Theory of Visual Attention (TVA) with tools that allowed us to assess various parameters that are related to different visual attention aspects (e.g., perception threshold, processing speed, visual short-term memory storage capacity, top-down control, spatial distribution of attention) and that are measurable on the same experimental basis. In Experiment 1, we found advantages of video game experts in perception threshold and visual processing speed; the latter being restricted to the lower positions of the used computer display. The observed advantages were not significantly moderated by general person-related characteristics such as personality traits, sensation seeking, intelligence, social anxiety, or health status. Experiment 2 tested a potential causal link between the expert advantages and video game practice with an intervention protocol. It found no effects of action video gaming on perception threshold, visual short-term memory storage capacity, iconic memory storage, top-down control, and spatial distribution of attention after 15 days of training. However, observations of a selected improvement of processing speed at the lower positions of the computer screen after video game training and of retest effects are suggestive for limited possibilities to improve basic aspects of visual attention (TVA) with practice.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    Keyword(s) / Subject(s): Action video gaming, Theory of visual attention, Practice effects, Processing speed
    School: Birkbeck Schools and Departments > School of Science > Psychological Sciences
    Depositing User: Administrator
    Date Deposited: 17 Apr 2015 11:37
    Last Modified: 17 Apr 2015 11:37
    URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/11936

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