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A HaemAtlas: characterizing gene expression in differentiated human blood cells

Watkins, N.A. and Gusnanto, A. and de Bono, B. and De, S. and Miranda-Saavedra, D. and Hardie, D.L. and Angenent, W.G. and Attwood, A.P. and Ellis, P.D. and Erber, W. and Foad, N.S. and Garner, S.F. and Isacke, C.M. and Jolley, J. and Koch, K. and Macaulay, I.C. and Morley, S.L. and Rendon, A. and Rice, K.M. and Taylor, N. and Thijssen-Timmer, D.C. and Tijssen, M.R. and van der Schoot, C.E. and Wernisch, Lorenz and Winzer, T. and Dudbridge, F. and Buckley, C.D. and Langford, C.F. and Teichmann, S. and Göttgens, B. and Ouwehand, W.H. (2009) A HaemAtlas: characterizing gene expression in differentiated human blood cells. Blood 113 (19), pp. 1-9. ISSN 0006-4971.

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2008-06-162958

Abstract

Hematopoiesis is a carefully controlled process that is regulated by complex networks of transcription factors that are, in part, controlled by signals resulting from ligand binding to cell-surface receptors. To further understand hematopoiesis, we have compared gene expression profiles of human erythroblasts, megakaryocytes, B cells, cytotoxic and helper T cells, natural killer cells, granulocytes, and monocytes using whole genome microarrays. A bioinformatics analysis of these data was performed focusing on transcription factors, immunoglobulin superfamily members, and lineage-specific transcripts. We observed that the numbers of lineage-specific genes varies by 2 orders of magnitude, ranging from 5 for cytotoxic T cells to 878 for granulocytes. In addition, we have identified novel coexpression patterns for key transcription factors involved in hematopoiesis (eg, GATA3-GFI1 and GATA2-KLF1). This study represents the most comprehensive analysis of gene expression in hematopoietic cells to date and has identified genes that play key roles in lineage commitment and cell function. The data, which are freely accessible, will be invaluable for future studies on hematopoiesis and the role of specific genes and will also aid the understanding of the recent genome-wide association studies.

Item Type: Article
School or Research Centre: Birkbeck Schools and Research Centres > School of Science > Biological Sciences
Depositing User: Administrator
Date Deposited: 04 Aug 2010 14:09
Last Modified: 17 Apr 2013 12:17
URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/1207

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