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    Developmental changes in infant brain activity during naturalistic social experiences

    Jones, Emily and Venema, K. and Lowy, R. and Earl, R. and Webb, S.J. (2015) Developmental changes in infant brain activity during naturalistic social experiences. Developmental Psychobiology 57 (7), pp. 842-853. ISSN 0012-1630.

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    Abstract

    Between 6 and 12 months, typically developing infants undergo a socio-cognitive ‘revolution’. The Interactive Specialization (IS) theory of brain development predicts that these behavioral changes will be underpinned by developmental increases in the power and topographic extent of socially selective cortical responses. To test this hypothesis, we used EEG to examine developmental changes in cortical selectivity for ecologically valid dynamic social versus non-social stimuli in a large cohort of 6- and 12-month-old infants. Consistent with the Interactive Specialization model, results showed that differences in EEG theta activity between social and non-social stimuli became more pronounced and widespread with age. Differences in EEG activity were most clearly elicited by a live naturalistic interaction, suggesting that measuring brain activity in ecologically valid contexts is central to mapping social brain development in infancy.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    Additional Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the article, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/dev.21336. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
    Keyword(s) / Subject(s): Interactive Specialization, Infant, EEG, social brain, video deficit effect, alpha power, theta power.
    School: Birkbeck Schools and Departments > School of Science > Psychological Sciences
    Research Centre: Brain and Cognitive Development, Centre for (CBCD)
    Depositing User: Users 3467 not found.
    Date Deposited: 03 Aug 2015 13:46
    Last Modified: 02 Dec 2016 11:48
    URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/12536

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