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    Industrial mining heritage and the legacy of environmental pollution in the Derbyshire Derwent catchment: quantifying contamination at a regional scale and developing integrated strategies for management of the wider historic environment

    Kossoff, David and Hudson-Edwards, Karen A. and Howard, A.J. and Knight, D. (2016) Industrial mining heritage and the legacy of environmental pollution in the Derbyshire Derwent catchment: quantifying contamination at a regional scale and developing integrated strategies for management of the wider historic environment. Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports 6 , pp. 190-199. ISSN 2352-409X.

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    Abstract

    The Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site (DVMWHS) exemplifies and records the 18th century birth of the factory or mill technology, and for the industrial spinning of cotton. The site is therefore a key global heritage asset. The Derbyshire Derwent catchment also contains another significant cultural asset with a long history – that of mining and, in particular, lead (Pb) mining. In this paper research on mining- and non-mining related Pb contamination of the Derwent catchment is reviewed and used to identify the risks it poses to the DVMWHS. The upper Derwent soils, though not impacted by mining, have high sediment-borne Pb concentrations, and the Pb is sourced from local conurbations (principally Manchester) and carried to the upper Derwent on the wind. River sediments in the middle and lower parts of the Derwent catchment are contaminated with Pb mined mainly between the 18th and 19th centuries and before, possibly as far back to the Bronze Age. The potential for large-scale, acidity-related chemical remobilization of this Pb is low in the Derwent catchment due to the largely alkaline nature of the underlying soils, but the potential for oxidation-reduction-related, and physical (flood-related), remobilization, is higher. Management guidelines for mining heritage assets and the DVMWHS are developed from the reviewed information, with the view that these will provide a framework for future work in, and management of, the DVMWHS that will be applicable to other World Heritage Sites affected by ongoing and past metal-mining. Focused collaborative work between archaeologists, geochemists, geomorphologists and mineralogistsis vital if the risks to the DVMWHS and other similarly-affected World Heritage Sites are to be quantified and, if necessary, mitigated.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    Keyword(s) / Subject(s): Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site, Derbyshire, lead mining, heritage, contamination, fluvial, aeolian
    School: Birkbeck Schools and Departments > School of Science > Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Depositing User: Karen Hudson Edwards
    Date Deposited: 24 Feb 2016 10:56
    Last Modified: 29 Jun 2017 09:18
    URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/14247

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