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    Enhanced motion after-effects in migraine are related to contrast sensitivity: implications for models of differences in precortical/cortical function

    Singh, Pia and Shepherd, Alex J. (2016) Enhanced motion after-effects in migraine are related to contrast sensitivity: implications for models of differences in precortical/cortical function. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science 57 (3), pp. 1228-1234. ISSN 0146-0404.

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    Abstract

    Purpose: Visual tests can be used as non-invasive tools to test models of the pathophysiology underlying neurological conditions, such as migraine. For example, there are reports that the motion after-effect, which involves neural processing in several cortical areas, is prolonged in migraine. There are also reports of impaired contrast sensitivity in migraine, however, attributed to a precortical dysfunction. This study explored associations between these two tests of visual function. Specifically, it aimed to clarify whether the magnitude of the motion after-effect is affected by contrast and contrast sensitivity. Methods: The motion after-effect was elicited after observers viewed a coherently moving pattern for 45 seconds. The duration of the subsequent after-effect was measured with three different test display contrasts (high, medium, low). Contrast sensitivity was also assessed. Results: For each test display contrast, the motion after-effect was prolonged in migraine compared to the control group. Contrast sensitivity was poorer in the migraine group and was a significant predictor of motion after-effect duration. Conclusions: These results suggest an anomaly in early motion processing pathways in migraine that is likely linked with those pathways underlying contrast sensitivity. They provide further evidence for differences in visual processing that begin early, potentially starting at the retina, which have consequences for performance on tasks that putatively examine cortical processing. Differences in both precortical and cortical visual pathways are implicated in the pathophysiology underlying migraine.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    Keyword(s) / Subject(s): migraine, motion perception, contrast sensitivity, visual processing, cortical processing, motion after-effect
    School: Birkbeck Schools and Departments > School of Science > Psychological Sciences
    Depositing User: Administrator
    Date Deposited: 18 Apr 2016 15:10
    Last Modified: 20 Feb 2018 11:23
    URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/14420

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