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    Audience effects on the neural correlates of relational reasoning in adolescence

    Dumontheil, Iroise and Wolf, L.K. and Blakemore, S.-J. (2016) Audience effects on the neural correlates of relational reasoning in adolescence. Neuropsychologia 87 , pp. 85-95. ISSN 0028-3932.

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    Abstract

    Adolescents are particularly sensitive to peer influence. This may partly be due to an increased salience of peers during adolescence. We investigated the effect of being observed by a peer on a cognitively challenging task, relational reasoning, which requires the evaluation and integration of multiple mental representations. Relational reasoning tasks engage a fronto-parietal network including the inferior parietal cortex, pre-supplementary motor area, dorsolateral and rostrolateral prefrontal cortices. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), peer audience effects on activation in this fronto-parietal network were compared in a group of 19 female mid-adolescents (aged 14-16 years) and 14 female adults (aged 23-28 years). Adolescent and adult relational reasoning accuracy was influenced by a peer audience as a function of task difficulty: the presence of a peer audience led to decreased accuracy in the complex, relational integration condition in both groups of participants. The fMRI results demonstrated that a peer audience differentially modulated activation in regions of the fronto-parietal network in adolescents and adults. Activation was increased in adolescents in the presence of a peer audience, while this was not the case in adults.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    Keyword(s) / Subject(s): Adolescence, Peer influence, fMRI, Audience Effect, Reasoning
    School: Birkbeck Schools and Departments > School of Science > Psychological Sciences
    Research Centre: Educational Neuroscience, Centre for, Brain and Cognitive Development, Centre for (CBCD)
    Depositing User: Administrator
    Date Deposited: 13 May 2016 13:30
    Last Modified: 09 Dec 2016 11:17
    URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/15175

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