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    Five fathers' experience of an adult son sustaining a cervical spinal cord injury: an Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis

    Hartie, K.J. and Smith, Jonathan A. (2016) Five fathers' experience of an adult son sustaining a cervical spinal cord injury: an Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Spinal Cord Series and Cases 2 , p. 16015. ISSN 2058-6124.

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    Abstract

    The paper presents an in-depth idiographic study exploring the experience of fathers who have an adult son with a cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Five participants were recruited and individual semi-structured interviews were conducted. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Two super-ordinate themes are presented highlighting. Firstly, the ongoing negative impact of their sons’ injury on the participants’ role as fathers’. This comprises the negative impact on emotions with guilt common for failing in their perceived role as a father. The dissonance experienced between wanting to help encourage their sons’ independence. Concern experienced due to their sons altered life trajectory and anxiety because they won’t be alive to protect their son in the future. Secondly, how participants cope and adjust to their son’s SCI are presented. Comprising of how positive thinking, such as focusing on their son surviving the trauma; and the influence of seeing their son cope well affects how participants cope. Also, reflecting on how the injury has changed their life helps participants, to an extent, make sense of the trauma. The results are discussed in relation to the relevant extant literature to give a unique perspective about how SCI impacts their perceived role as fathers and the struggle to cope and adjust to the trauma. Future research investigating the impact of SCI on the family is warranted to better understand the wider implications.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    School: Birkbeck Schools and Departments > School of Science > Psychological Sciences
    Depositing User: Jonathan A Smith
    Date Deposited: 08 Jul 2016 13:12
    Last Modified: 03 Nov 2017 09:41
    URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/15538

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