BIROn - Birkbeck Institutional Research Online

    Infants rely more on gaze cues from own-race than other-race adults for learning under uncertainty

    Xiao, N.G. and Wu, R. and Quinn, P.C. and Liu, S. and Tummeltshammer, K.S. and Kirkham, Natasha and Ge, L. and Pascalis, O. and Lee, K. (2018) Infants rely more on gaze cues from own-race than other-race adults for learning under uncertainty. Child Development 89 (3), e229-e244. ISSN 0009-3920.

    [img]
    Preview
    Text
    18132.pdf - Author's Accepted Manuscript
    Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial.

    Download (766kB) | Preview

    Abstract

    Differential experience leads infants to have perceptual processing advantages for own- over other-race faces, but whether this experience has down-stream consequences is unknown. Three experiments examined whether 7-month-olds (Range = 5.9-8.5 months, N = 96) use gaze from own- versus other-race adults to anticipate events. When gaze predicted an event’s occurrence with 100% reliability, 7-month-olds followed both adults equally; with 25% (chance) reliability, neither was followed. However, with 50% (uncertain) reliability, infants followed own- over other-race gaze. Differential face race experience may thus affect how infants use social cues from own- versus other-race adults for learning. Such findings suggest that infants integrate online statistical reliability information with prior knowledge of own- versus other-race to guide social interaction and learning.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    Additional Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the article, which has been published in final form at the link above. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
    School: Birkbeck Schools and Departments > School of Science > Psychological Sciences
    Research Centre: Brain and Cognitive Development, Centre for (CBCD)
    Depositing User: Dr Natasha Kirkham
    Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2017 15:31
    Last Modified: 27 Jul 2019 09:57
    URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/18132

    Statistics

    Downloads
    Activity Overview
    72Downloads
    146Hits

    Additional statistics are available via IRStats2.

    Archive Staff Only (login required)

    Edit/View Item Edit/View Item