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    Parent-child learning interactions: a review of the literature on scaffolding

    Mermelshtine, Roni (2017) Parent-child learning interactions: a review of the literature on scaffolding. British Journal of Educational Psychology 87 (2), pp. 241-254. ISSN 0007-0998.

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    Abstract

    Background: Scaffolding can be observed during learning-based interactions, when interventions by parents are adjusted according to children's observed abilities, with the main goal of enabling the child to work independently (Wood et al., 1976, Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, 17, 89). Such contingent instruction behaviours occur from infancy, and are said to be relevant for children's development of executive function, language acquisition, and cognitive and academic abilities. Scaffolding behaviours are considered a product of the family and the wider context, a process affected by parent and child characteristics, and the environment they inhabit. Over 40 years of scaffolding research has produced an abundance of findings. Early investigations were concerned with the conceptualization of scaffolding, whereas more recent studies build upon the theory, testing its correlates and relevance for child development. Aims: This article offers an overview of the literature, focusing on the relevance of scaffolding for child developmental outcomes, and the factors associated with individual differences in the process. Structure: The article is structured such that the origins of the theory and its definitions are discussed first, followed by an overview of the correlates of scaffolding. The review concludes with a critical evaluation of the literature, proposing novel avenues for future research.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    Keyword(s) / Subject(s): scaffolding, individual differences, contingent response, parent–child interactions
    School: Birkbeck Schools and Departments > School of Science > Psychological Sciences
    Depositing User: Administrator
    Date Deposited: 28 Mar 2017 15:51
    Last Modified: 10 Nov 2017 15:08
    URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/18362

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