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    IKKγ mimetic peptides block the resistance to apoptosis associated with KSHV infection

    Briggs, L.C. and Chan, A.W.E. and Davis, C.A. and Whitelock, N. and Hotiana, H. and Baratchian, M. and Bagneris, Claire and Selwood, D. and Collins, M.K. and Barrett, Tracey (2017) IKKγ mimetic peptides block the resistance to apoptosis associated with KSHV infection. Journal of Virology 91 (23), e01170-17. ISSN 0022-538X.

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    Abstract

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a lymphogenic disorder associated with KSHV infection. Key to the survival and proliferation of PEL is the canonical NF-kB pathway that becomes constitutively activated following overexpression of the viral oncoprotein ks-vFLIP. This arises from its capacity to form a complex with the modulatory subunit of the IKK kinase, IKKgamma (or NEMO) resulting in the overproduction of proteins that promote cellular survival and prevent apoptosis; both of which are important drivers of tumourigenesis. Using a combination of cell based and biophysical assays together with structural techniques, we show that the observed resistance to cell death is largely independent of autophagy or major death receptor signalling pathways and demonstrate that direct targeting of the ks-vFLIP-IKKgamma interaction both in cells and in vitro can be achieved using IKKgamma mimetic peptides. Our results further reveal that these peptides not only induce cell killing, but potently sensitise PEL to the pro-apoptotic agents tumour necrosis factor alpha and etoposide and are the first to confirm ks-vFLIP as a tractable target for the treatment of PEL and related disorders.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    School: Birkbeck Schools and Departments > School of Science > Biological Sciences
    Depositing User: Tracey Barrett
    Date Deposited: 03 Oct 2017 12:30
    Last Modified: 14 Nov 2017 16:54
    URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/19849

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