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The demand for military expenditure in developing countries: hostility versus capability

Dunne, J.P. and Perlo-Freeman, S. and Smith, Ron P. (2008) The demand for military expenditure in developing countries: hostility versus capability. Defence and Peace Economics 19 (4), pp. 293-302. ISSN 1024-2694.

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10242690802166566

Abstract

This paper considers the interpretation of the empirical results of the developing literature on the demand for military spending that specifies a general model with arms race and spill-over effects and estimates it on cross-section and panel data. It questions whether it is meaningful to talk of an 'arms race' in panel data or cross-section data, and suggests that it may be more appropriate to talk about the relevant variables - aggregate military spending of the 'Security Web' (i.e. all neighbours and other security-influencing powers) and the aggregate military spending of 'Potential Enemies' - as acting as proxies for threat perceptions, which will reflect both hostility and capability.

Item Type: Article
Keyword(s) / Subject(s): Military spending, developing countries, demand
School or Research Centre: Birkbeck Schools and Research Centres > School of Business, Economics & Informatics > Economics, Mathematics and Statistics
Depositing User: Administrator
Date Deposited: 26 Jan 2011 16:16
Last Modified: 17 Apr 2013 12:18
URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/1990

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