BIROn - Birkbeck Institutional Research Online

    Genome-wide profiling of humoral immunity and pathogen genes under selection identifies immune evasion tactics of Chlamydia trachomatis during ocular infection

    Pickering, H. and Teng, A. and Faal, N. and Joof, H. and Makalo, P. and Cassama, E. and Nabicassa, M. and Last, A.R. and Burr, S.E. and Rowland-Jones, S.L. and Thomson, N.R. and Roberts, C.H. and Mabey, D.C.W. and Bailey, R.L. and Hayward, Richard D. and de la Maza, L.M. and Holland, M. J. (2017) Genome-wide profiling of humoral immunity and pathogen genes under selection identifies immune evasion tactics of Chlamydia trachomatis during ocular infection. Scientific Reports 7 (1), ISSN 2045-2322.

    [img]
    Preview
    Text
    20197.pdf - Published Version of Record
    Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

    Download (3MB) | Preview

    Abstract

    The frequency and duration of Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) ocular infections decrease with age, suggesting development of partial immunity. However, there is a lack of clear correlates of immunity to Ct infection in humans. We screened sera from a cohort of Gambian children followed for six-months against a Ct-proteome microarray. At genome sequence level, we detected signatures of selection from a population of ocular Ct isolates from Guinea-Bissau. Together these approaches allowed us to highlight the focus of humoral responses and hypothesise new modes of pathogen immune evasion. Children who were susceptible to frequent and/or prolonged Ct infection had a less focussed antibody response, including preferential recognition of forty-two antigens. There was evidence of positive and purifying selection across the genome, but little balancing selection. In contrast, most antigens that were associated with susceptibility were under neutral selection. These data suggest an evasion strategy in which Ct presents a large panel of irrelevant antigens to the immune system to block or misdirect protective responses. Development of a focused immune response, possibly induced through vaccination, may be an effective strategy to promote protection to Ct infection.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    School: Birkbeck Schools and Departments > School of Science > Biological Sciences
    Depositing User: Administrator
    Date Deposited: 02 Jul 2018 09:01
    Last Modified: 02 Jul 2018 09:01
    URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/20197

    Statistics

    Downloads
    Activity Overview
    36Downloads
    32Hits

    Additional statistics are available via IRStats2.

    Archive Staff Only (login required)

    Edit/View Item Edit/View Item