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    Pain: metaphor, body, and culture in Anglo-American societies between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries

    Bourke, Joanna (2014) Pain: metaphor, body, and culture in Anglo-American societies between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries. Rethinking History 18 (4), pp. 475-498. ISSN 1364-2529.

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    Abstract

    This article explores the relationship between metaphorical languages, body, and culture, and suggests that such an analysis can reveal a great deal about the meaning and experience of pain in Anglo-American societies between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries. It uses concepts within embodied cognition to speculate on how historians can write a history of sensation. Bodies are actively engaged in the linguistic processes and social interactions that constitute painful sensations. Language is engaged in a dialogue with physiological bodies and social environments. And culture collaborates in the creation of physiological bodies and metaphorical systems.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    Additional Information: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis, available online at the link above.
    Keyword(s) / Subject(s): pain, metaphor, body, culture, history, British, American, cognitive linguistics
    School: Birkbeck Schools and Departments > School of Social Sciences, History and Philosophy > History, Classics and Archaeology
    Depositing User: Administrator
    Date Deposited: 29 Jan 2018 14:36
    Last Modified: 29 Jan 2018 15:49
    URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/21063

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