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    Training cognitive control to reduce emotional vulnerability in breast cancer

    Swainston, J. and Derakhshan, Nazanin (2018) Training cognitive control to reduce emotional vulnerability in breast cancer. Psycho-Oncology 27 (7), pp. 1780-1786. ISSN 1099-1611.

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    Abstract

    Objectives: Breast cancer enhances anxiety and depressive vulnerability, profoundly impairing the quality of life in survivors. Hinging on recent research that training attentional control can reduce emotional vulnerability, we assess how improving cognitive function could reduce emotional vulnerability in female survivors of breast cancer. Methods: Participants took part in a course of adaptive dual n-back cognitive training (Training Group) or a non-adaptive active control group (Active Control) for 12 days across a two-week period. Transfer-related training gains were assessed immediately after the intervention, at a shorter one-month follow-up and at a longer follow-up time of approximately 15 months post intervention, to assess sustainability of training effects. Results: Adaptive cognitive training reduced anxiety and rumination with effects evident at shorter and longer term follow-up assessments. Conclusions: Our results are amongst the first to suggest that adaptive cognitive training can reduce emotional vulnerability in breast cancer, with the potential to enhance quality of life in survivorship. Our findings have profound implications for designing interventions targeting cognitive function in populations who’ve suffered from cancer.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    Additional Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the article, which has been published in final form at the link above. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
    Keyword(s) / Subject(s): Breast Cancer, Attentional Control, Cognitive Training, Anxiety, Psycho-oncology
    School: Birkbeck Schools and Departments > School of Science > Psychological Sciences
    Depositing User: Nazanin Derakhshan
    Date Deposited: 03 May 2018 09:54
    Last Modified: 03 May 2019 00:10
    URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/22314

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