BIROn - Birkbeck Institutional Research Online

The lady vanishes: what's missing from the stem cell debate

Dickenson, Donna (2006) The lady vanishes: what's missing from the stem cell debate. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 3 (1-2), pp. 43-54. ISSN 1176-7529.

[img]
Preview
Text
Dickenson2006.pdf

Download (253Kb) | Preview
Official URL: http://www.springerlink.com/content/1176-7529

Abstract

Most opponents of somatic cell nuclear transfer and embryonic stem cell technologies base their arguments on the twin assertions that the embryo is either a human being or a potential human being, and that it is wrong to destroy a human being or potential human being in order to produce stem cell lines. Proponents’ justifications of stem cell research are more varied, but not enough to escape the charge of obsession with the status of the embryo. What unites the two warring sides in ‘the stem cell wars’ is that women are equally invisible to both: ‘the lady vanishes’. Yet the only legitimate property in the body is that which women possess in their reproductive tissue and the products of their reproductive labour. By drawing on the accepted characterisation in law of property as a bundle of rights, and on a Hegelian model of contract as mutual recognition, we can lessen the impact of the tendency to regard women and their eggs as merely receptacles and women’s reproductive labour as unimportant.

Item Type: Article
School or Research Centre: Birkbeck Schools and Research Centres > School of Social Sciences, History and Philosophy > Philosophy
Depositing User: Administrator
Date Deposited: 07 Sep 2005
Last Modified: 17 Apr 2013 12:33
URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/227

Archive Staff Only (login required)

Edit/View Item Edit/View Item