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The neural implementation of task rule activation in the task-cuing paradigm: an event-related fMRI study

Shi, Y. and Zhou, X. and Muller, Hermann J. and Schubert, T. (2010) The neural implementation of task rule activation in the task-cuing paradigm: an event-related fMRI study. Neuroimage 51 (3), pp. 1253-1264. ISSN 1053-8119.

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.01.097

Abstract

To isolate the neural correlates for task rule activation from those related to general task preparation, the effect of a cue explicitly specifying the S–R correspondences (rule-cue) was contrasted with the effects of a cue specifying only the task to performed (task-cue). While the task-cue provides merely information about the type of task, the rule-cue is explicit about both the task type and the task rule (i.e., the set of S–R correspondences). The rule-cue was expected to activate the task rule more efficiently in the preparation period (prior to target presentation); by contrast, in the task-cue condition, part of the task rule activation was expected to be postponed into the task execution period (following the presentation of the target). In an event-related fMRI experiment, we found the right anterior and middle parts of the middle frontal and superior frontal gyri, the right inferior frontal junction, the pre-SMA, as well as the right superior and inferior parietal lobes to show larger activation elicited by the rule-cue than by the task-cue prior to target presentation. Conversely, the results revealed larger activations in these regions in the task-cue than in the rule-cue condition during the task execution period. In summary, this study identified some of the neural correlates of task rule activation and showed that these are a subset of the general task preparation network.

Item Type: Article
Keyword(s) / Subject(s): Task rule activation, task preparation, rule-cue, task-cue, cue-only trials, task switching, fMRI
School or Research Centre: Birkbeck Schools and Research Centres > School of Science > Psychological Sciences
Depositing User: Administrator
Date Deposited: 17 Dec 2010 13:52
Last Modified: 17 Apr 2013 12:19
URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/2529

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