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The 2003 Licensing Act's impact on crime and disorder: an evaluation

Hough, Mike and Hunter, G. (2008) The 2003 Licensing Act's impact on crime and disorder: an evaluation. Criminology & Criminal Justice 8 (3), pp. 239-260. ISSN 1748-8958.

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1748895808092428

Abstract

The Licensing Act 2003, coming into force in November 2005 in England and Wales, abolished set licensing hours for pubs and clubs. The aim was to liberalize a rigid system while reducing the problems of drinking and disorder associated with a standard closing time. This article summarizes the results of an evaluation funded by the Home Office. Despite widespread concern that the legislation would lead to `24-hour drinking' and an increase in associated problems, the experience of the first year shows very little change. The scale of change in licensing hours was variable but modest: while the majority of pubs extended their hours, most of these extensions were short. Thus the average national increase in opening hours was small. Alcohol consumption showed a slight fall. There was no obvious impact on violent crime and disorder, according to a range of measures, including crime statistics, victim surveys and medical statistics. These results are not particularly consistent with findings in other jurisdictions which have relaxed controls over opening hours of pubs and clubs.

Item Type: Article
Keyword(s) / Subject(s): alcohol-related crime, binge drinking, disorder, licensing, violence
School or Research Centre: Birkbeck Schools and Research Centres > School of Law
Depositing User: Administrator
Date Deposited: 19 Jul 2011 13:59
Last Modified: 17 Apr 2013 12:21
URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/3813

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