BIROn - Birkbeck Institutional Research Online

Consensus paper: Combining transcranial stimulation with neuroimaging

Siebner, H.R. and Bergmann, T.O. and Bestmann, S. and Massimini, M. and Johansen-Berg, H. and Mochizuki, H. and Bohning, D.E. and Boorman, E.D. and Groppa, S. and Miniussi, C. and Pascual-Leone, A. and Huber, R. and Taylor, Paul C.J. and Ilmoniemi, R.J. and de Gennaro, L. and Strafella, A.P. and Kähkönen, S. and Klöppel, S. and Frisoni, G.B. and George, M.S. and Hallett, M. and Brandt, S.A. and Rushworth, M.F. and Ziemann, U. and Rothwell, J.C. and Ward, N. and Cohen, L.G. and Baudewig, J. and Paus, T. and Ugawa, Y. and Rossini, P.M. (2009) Consensus paper: Combining transcranial stimulation with neuroimaging. Brain Stimulation 2 (2), pp. 58-80. ISSN 1935-861X.

Full text not available from this repository.
Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brs.2008.11.002

Abstract

In the last decade, combined transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)-neuroimaging studies have greatly stimulated research in the field of TMS and neuroimaging. Here, we review how TMS can be combined with various neuroimaging techniques to investigate human brain function. When applied during neuroimaging (online approach), TMS can be used to test how focal cortex stimulation acutely modifies the activity and connectivity in the stimulated neuronal circuits. TMS and neuroimaging can also be separated in time (offline approach). A conditioning session of repetitive TMS (rTMS) may be used to induce rapid reorganization in functional brain networks. The temporospatial patterns of TMS-induced reorganization can be subsequently mapped by using neuroimaging methods. Alternatively, neuroimaging may be performed first to localize brain areas that are involved in a given task. The temporospatial information obtained by neuroimaging can be used to define the optimal site and time point of stimulation in a subsequent experiment in which TMS is used to probe the functional contribution of the stimulated area to a specific task. In this review, we first address some general methodologic issues that need to be taken into account when using TMS in the context of neuroimaging. We then discuss the use of specific brain mapping techniques in conjunction with TMS. We emphasize that the various neuroimaging techniques offer complementary information and have different methodologic strengths and weaknesses.

Item Type: Article
Keyword(s) / Subject(s): transcranial magnetic stimulation, TMS, neuroimaging, multimodal brain mapping, EEG, fMRI, MRI, PET, NIRS, MEG
School or Research Centre: Birkbeck Schools and Research Centres > School of Science > Psychological Sciences
Depositing User: Administrator
Date Deposited: 28 Jul 2011 09:11
Last Modified: 17 Apr 2013 12:21
URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/3897

Archive Staff Only (login required)

Edit/View Item Edit/View Item