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    Multiple routes from occipital to temporal cortices during reading

    Richardson, Fiona M. and Seghier, M.L. and Leff, A.P. and Thomas, Michael S.C. and Price, C.J. (2011) Multiple routes from occipital to temporal cortices during reading. Journal of Neuroscience 31 (22), pp. 8239-8247. ISSN 0270-6474.

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    Abstract

    Contemporary models of the neural system that supports reading propose that activity in a ventral occipitotemporal area (vOT) drives activity in higher-order language areas, for example, those in the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) and anterior superior temporal sulcus (aSTS). We used fMRI with dynamic causal modeling (DCM) to investigate evidence for other routes from visual cortex to the left temporal lobe language areas. First we identified activations in posterior inferior occipital (iO) and vOT areas that were more activated for silent reading than listening to words and sentences; and in pSTS and aSTS areas that were commonly activated for reading relative to false-fonts and listening to words relative to reversed words. Second, in three different DCM analyses, we tested whether visual processing of words modulates activity from the following: (1) iO→vOT, iO→pSTS, both, or neither; (2) vOT→pSTS, iO→pSTS, both or neither; and (3) pSTS→aSTS, vOT→aSTS, both, or neither. We found that reading words increased connectivity (1) from iO to both pSTS and vOT; (2) to pSTS from both iO and vOT; and (3) to aSTS from both vOT and pSTS. These results highlight three potential processing streams in the occipitotemporal cortex: iO→pSTS→aSTS; iO→vOT→aSTS; and iO→vOT→pSTS→aSTS. We discuss these results in terms of cognitive models of reading and propose that efficient reading relies on the integrity of all these pathways.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    School: Birkbeck Schools and Departments > School of Science > Psychological Sciences
    Research Centre: Birkbeck Knowledge Lab, Brain and Cognitive Development, Centre for (CBCD)
    Depositing User: Administrator
    Date Deposited: 15 Aug 2011 15:30
    Last Modified: 02 Dec 2016 13:41
    URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/4087

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