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Education and the "thick" epistemology

Kotzee, Ben (2011) Education and the "thick" epistemology. Educational Theory 61 (5), pp. 549-564. ISSN 00132004.

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1741-5446.2011.00420.x

Abstract

In this essay Ben Kotzee addresses the implications of Bernard Williams's distinction between “thick” and “thin” concepts in ethics for epistemology and for education. Kotzee holds that, as in the case of ethics, one may distinguish between “thick” and “thin” concepts of epistemology and, further, that this distinction points to the importance of the study of the intellectual virtues in epistemology. Following Harvey Siegel, Kotzee contends that “educated” is a thick epistemic concept, and he explores the consequences of this for the subjects of epistemology and philosophy of education. Ultimately, Kotzee argues that its nature as a “thick” concept makes education suited to play an important role in explaining how the intellectual virtues can be acquired.

Item Type: Article
School or Research Centre: Birkbeck Schools and Research Centres > School of Social Sciences, History and Philosophy > Geography, Environment and Development Studies
Depositing User: Administrator
Date Deposited: 31 Jan 2012 14:14
Last Modified: 11 Mar 2014 13:27
URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/4577

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