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    How sustainable is the communalising discourse of ‘new’ conservation? the masking of difference, inequality and aspiration in the fledgling ‘conservancies’ of Namibia

    Sullivan, Sian (2002) How sustainable is the communalising discourse of ‘new’ conservation? the masking of difference, inequality and aspiration in the fledgling ‘conservancies’ of Namibia. In: Chatty, D. and Colchester, M. (eds.) Conservation and Mobile Indigenous people: Displacement, Forced Settlement and Sustainable Development. Studies in Forced Migration 10. Oxford, UK: Berghahn, pp. 158-187. ISBN 9781571818423.

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    Abstract

    Book synopsis: Wildlife conservation and other environmental protection projects can have tremendous impact on the lives and livelihoods of the often mobile, difficult-to-reach, and marginal peoples who inhabit the same territory. The contributors to this collection of case studies, social scientists as well as natural scientists, are concerned with this human element in biodiversity. They examine the interface between conservation and indigenous communities forced to move or to settle elsewhere in order to accommodate environmental policies and biodiversity concerns. The case studies investigate successful and not so successful community-managed, as well as local participatory, conservation projects in Africa, the Middle East, South and South Eastern Asia, Australia and Latin America. There are lessons to be learned from recent efforts in community managed conservation and this volume significantly contributes to that discussion.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Book Section
    School: Birkbeck Schools and Departments > School of Social Sciences, History and Philosophy > Department of Geography
    Depositing User: Dr Sian Sullivan
    Date Deposited: 31 Jan 2013 14:08
    Last Modified: 17 Apr 2013 12:34
    URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/6053

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