BIROn - Birkbeck Institutional Research Online

A mob of incoherent symptoms?: neurasthenia in British medical discourse, 1860-1920

Sengoopta, Chandak (2001) A mob of incoherent symptoms?: neurasthenia in British medical discourse, 1860-1920. In: Gijswijt-Hofstra, Marijke and Porter, Roy (eds.) Cultures of neurasthenia: from Beard to the first world war. Clio Medica/The Wellcome Series in the History of Medicine 63. Amsterdam / New York, NY: Rodopi, pp. 97-115. ISBN 9789042009219.

Full text not available from this repository.
Official URL: http://www.rodopi.nl/senj.asp?BookId=clio+63

Abstract

Neurasthenia, meaning nerve weakness, was ‘invented’ in the United States as a disorder of modernity, caused by the fast pace of urban life. Soon after, from the early 1880s onwards, this modern disease crossed the Atlantic. Neurasthenia became much less ‘popular’ in Britain or the Netherlands than in Germany. Neurasthenia’s heyday continued into the first decade of the twentieth century. The label referred to conditions similar to those currently labelled as chronic fatigue syndrome. Why this rise and fall of neurasthenia, and why these differences in popularity? This book, which emerged out of an Anglo-Dutch-German conference held in June 2000, explores neurasthenia’s manysided history from a comparative perspective. (Description from the publisher website. http://www.rodopi.nl/senj.asp?BookId=clio+63)

Item Type: Book Section
School or Research Centre: Birkbeck Schools and Research Centres > School of Social Sciences, History and Philosophy > History, Classics and Archaeology
Depositing User: Ms. Catherine Richardson
Date Deposited: 09 Dec 2008 16:59
Last Modified: 17 Apr 2013 12:16
URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/760

Archive Staff Only (login required)

Edit/View Item Edit/View Item