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    Accuracy of recall of information about a cancer-predisposing BRCA1/2 gene mutation among patients and relatives

    Jacobs, C. and Dancyger, Caroline and Smith, Jonathan A. and Michie, S. (2015) Accuracy of recall of information about a cancer-predisposing BRCA1/2 gene mutation among patients and relatives. European Journal of Human Genetics 23 , pp. 147-151. ISSN 1018-4813.

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    Abstract

    This observational study aimed to (i) compare the accuracy of information recalled by patients and relatives following genetic counselling about a newly identified BRCA1/2 mutation, (ii) identify differences in accuracy of information about genetics and hereditary cancer and (iii) investigate whether accuracy among relatives improved when information was provided directly by genetics health professionals. Semistructured interviews following results from consultations with 10 breast/ovarian cancer patients and 22 relatives were audio-recorded and transcribed. Information provided by the genetics health professional was tracked through the families and coded for accuracy. Accuracy was analysed using the Wilcoxon Signed-Ranks test. Sources of information were tested using Spearman’s rank-order correlation coefficient. Fifty-three percent of the information recalled by patients was accurate. Accuracy of recall among relatives was significantly lower than that among patients (P=0.017). Both groups recalled a lower proportion of information about hereditary cancer than about genetics (P=0.005). Relatives who learnt the information from the patient alone recalled significantly less accurate information than those informed directly by genetics health professionals (P=0.001). Following genetic counselling about a BRCA1/2 mutation, accuracy of recall was low among patients and relatives, particularly about hereditary cancer. Multiple sources of information, including direct contact with genetics health professionals, may improve the accuracy of information among relatives.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    School: Birkbeck Schools and Departments > School of Science > Psychological Sciences
    Depositing User: Administrator
    Date Deposited: 27 May 2014 11:28
    Last Modified: 31 Aug 2015 23:11
    URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/9798

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