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    Host-pathogen reorganisation during host cell entry by Chlamydia trachomatis

    Nans, Andrea and Ford, Charlotte and Hayward, Richard D. (2015) Host-pathogen reorganisation during host cell entry by Chlamydia trachomatis. Microbes and Infection 17 (11), pp. 727-731. ISSN 1286-4579.

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    Abstract

    Chlamydia trachomatis is obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen that remains a significant public health burden worldwide. A critical early event during infection is chlamydial entry into non-phagocytic host epithelial cells. Like other Gram-negative bacteria, C. trachomatis uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver virulence effector proteins into host cells. These effectors trigger bacterial uptake and promote bacterial survival and replication within the host cell. In this review, we highlight recent cryo-electron tomography that has provided striking insights into the initial interactions between Chlamydia and its host. We describe the polarised structure of extracellular C. trachomatis elementary bodies (EBs), and the supramolecular organisation of T3SS complexes on the EB surface, in addition to the changes in host and pathogen architecture that accompany bacterial internalisation and EB encapsulation into early intracellular vacuoles. Finally, we consider the implications for further understanding the mechanism of C. trachomatis entry and how this might relate to those of other bacteria and viruses.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    Keyword(s) / Subject(s): Chlamydia, Type III secretion, Entry, Cytoskeleton, Cryo-electron tomography
    School: Birkbeck Schools and Departments > School of Science > Biological Sciences
    Research Centre: Structural Molecular Biology, Institute of (ISMB)
    Depositing User: Richard Hayward
    Date Deposited: 07 Sep 2015 11:16
    Last Modified: 13 Dec 2019 19:45
    URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/12897

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