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    'May I be alive when I die!' Dreaming of reanimation in Flaubert, Beckett and NDiaye

    Asibong, Andrew (2017) 'May I be alive when I die!' Dreaming of reanimation in Flaubert, Beckett and NDiaye. In: Asibong, Andrew and Campmas, A. (eds.) Flaubert, Beckett, NDiaye: The Aesthetics, Emotions and Politics of Failure. Faux Titre. Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Brill/Rodopi. ISBN 9789004337152.

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    Abstract

    In his chapter ‘“May I be alive when I die!’ Dreaming of (re)animation in Flaubert, Beckett and NDiaye’, Andrew Asibong argues that the protagonists of Flaubert, Beckett and NDiaye do not truly live live, and that, in exactly the same way, they fail to properly die. Asibong unpacks this strangely ‘undead’ quality that permeates the worlds of Flaubert, Beckett and NDiaye by focusing on the analogous way in which all three writers play – in a remarkably ghoulish manner – with the representation of suicide. After examining a few instances of bewildering pseudo-resurrection in Flaubert and Beckett, Asibong suggests, via the psychoanalytic work of André Green and his theory of the ‘dead mother’, some potentially instructive emotional frameworks through which to read the failure of their characters to finally die.

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