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    The significance of rainstorm variations to shallow translational hillslope failure

    Brooks, Susan and Richards, K.S. (1994) The significance of rainstorm variations to shallow translational hillslope failure. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms 19 (1), pp. 85-94. ISSN 0197-9337.

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    Abstract

    Landsliding in eastern Scotland results from high-magnitude rainstorms generated under either cyclonic or anticyclonic conditions, particularly during the summer. Data from Aviemore indicated that cyclonic storms produce higher rainfall totals than anticyclonic storms, as well as being of longer duration and lower intensity. The distribution of rain during individual storms also varies with the synoptic conditions under which the storms are produced. These different rainfall characteristics produce different geomorphic responses, which can be investigated in detail using physical based modelling. In this paper, a physically based coupled hydrology–stability model is used to assess the significance of these rainfall characteristics to soil moisture response and slope instability for mature podsols. The results provide evidence that rainstorms of different synoptic origin produce varying hydrological response, involving both the extent and the timing of moisture content change. This affects the depth and timing of slope failure, with anticyclonic storms promoting a large, rapid response in the factor of safety at shallow depths within the soil. Cyclonic storms produce a more gradual response, with the region of probable failure being deeper. Futhermore, each of these storm types is associated with different rainfall distributions, and this is also shown to have a significant effect on the timing and depth of slope instability.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    School: Birkbeck Schools and Departments > School of Social Sciences, History and Philosophy > Department of Geography
    Depositing User: Sarah Hall
    Date Deposited: 03 Nov 2016 17:32
    Last Modified: 03 Nov 2016 17:32
    URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/16597

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