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    A twin study exploring the association between childhood emotional and behaviour problems and specific psychotic experiences in a community sample of adolescents

    Shakoor, Sania and McGuire, P. and Cardno, A.G. and Freeman, D. and Ronald, Angelica (2017) A twin study exploring the association between childhood emotional and behaviour problems and specific psychotic experiences in a community sample of adolescents. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 59 (5), pp. 565-573. ISSN 0021-9630.

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    Abstract

    Background: Childhood emotional and behaviour problems are antecedents for later psychopathology. This study investigated genetic and environmental influences shaping the longitudinal association between childhood emotional and behaviour problems and specific PEs. Method: In a community-based twin sample, parents reported on emotional and behaviour problems when twins were ages-7 and 12 years. At age-16 years, specific PEs were measured using self-reports and parent-reports. Structural equation model-fitting was conducted. Results: Childhood emotional and behaviour problems were significantly associated with paranoia, cognitive disorganisation, and parent-rated negative symptoms in adolescence (mean r= .15-.38), and to a lesser extent with hallucinations, grandiosity, and anhedonia (mean r = .04-.12). Genetic influences on childhood emotional and behaviour problems explained significant proportions of variance in adolescent paranoia (4%), cognitive disorganisation (8%), and parent-rated negative symptoms (3%). Unique environmental influences on childhood emotional and behaviour problems explained <1% of variance in PEs. Common environmental influences were only relevant for the relationship between childhood emotional and behaviour problems and parent-rated negative symptoms (explaining 28% of variance) and are partly due to correlated rater effects. Conclusions: Childhood emotional and behaviour problems are significantly, if weakly, associated with adolescent PEs. These associations are driven in part by common genetic influences underlying both emotional and behaviour problems and PEs. However, psychotic experiences in adolescence are largely influenced by genetic and environmental factors that are independent of general childhood emotional and behaviour problems, suggesting they are not merely an extension of childhood emotional and behaviour problems.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    Additional Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the article, which has been published in final form at the link above. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
    Keyword(s) / Subject(s): psychotic experiences, emotional and behaviour problems, childhood, adolescence, twin study
    School: Birkbeck Schools and Departments > School of Science > Psychological Sciences
    Depositing User: Angelica Ronald
    Date Deposited: 13 Oct 2017 08:24
    Last Modified: 17 Oct 2019 04:47
    URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/20047

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