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    Don’t forget to look down - collaborative approaches to predator conservation

    Redpath, S.M. and Linnell, J.D.C. and Festa-Bianchet, M. and Boitani, L. and Bunnefeld, N. and Dickman, A. and Gutierrez, R.J. and Irvine, R.J. and Johansson, M. and Majic, A. and McMahon, B. and Pooley, Simon and Sandstrom, C. and Sjolander-Lindqvist, A. and Skogen, K. and Swenson, J.E. and Trouwborst, A. and Young, J. and Milner-Gulland, E.J. (2017) Don’t forget to look down - collaborative approaches to predator conservation. Biological Reviews 92 (4), 2157- 2163. ISSN 1464-7931.

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    Abstract

    Finding effective ways of conserving large carnivores is widely recognised as a priority in conservation. However, there is disagreement about the most effective way to do this, with some favouring top-down ‘command and control’ approaches and others favouring collaboration. Arguments for coercive top-down approaches have been presented elsewhere; here we present arguments for collaboration. In many parts of the developed world, flexibility of approach is built into the legislation, so that conservation objectives are balanced with other legitimate goals. In the developing world, limited resources, poverty and weak governance mean that collaborative approaches are likely to play a particularly important part in carnivore conservation. In general, coercive policies may lead to the deterioration of political legitimacy and potentially to non-compliance issues such as illegal killing, whereas collaborative approaches may lead to psychological ownership, enhanced trust, learning, and better social outcomes. Sustainable hunting/trapping plays a crucial part in the conservation and management of many large carnivores. There are many different models for how to conserve carnivores effectively across the world, research is now required to reduce uncertainty and examine the effectiveness of these approaches in different contexts.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    Additional Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the article, which has been published in final form at the link above. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
    School: Birkbeck Schools and Departments > School of Social Sciences, History and Philosophy > Department of Geography
    Depositing User: Dr Simon Pooley
    Date Deposited: 18 Dec 2017 09:46
    Last Modified: 27 Jul 2019 06:51
    URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/20653

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