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    Magnetic resonance enterography, small bowel ultrasound and colonoscopy to diagnose and stage Crohn’s disease; patient acceptability, and perceived burden

    Miles, Anne and Bhatnagar, G. and Halligan, S. and Gupta, A. and Tolan, D. and Zealley, I. and Taylor, S. (2018) Magnetic resonance enterography, small bowel ultrasound and colonoscopy to diagnose and stage Crohn’s disease; patient acceptability, and perceived burden. European Radiology 29 (3), pp. 1083-1093. ISSN 0938-7994.

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    Abstract

    Objectives: To compare patient acceptability and burden of magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) and ultrasound (US) to each other, and to other enteric investigations, particularly colonoscopy. Methods: 159 patients (mean age 38, 94 female) with newly diagnosed or relapsing Crohn’s disease, prospectively recruited to a multicentre diagnostic accuracy study comparing MRE and US, completed an experience questionnaire on the burden and acceptability of small bowel investigations between December 2013 and September 2016. Acceptability, recovery time, scan burden and willingness to repeat the test were analysed using the Wilcoxon signed rank and McNemar tests; and group differences in scan burden with Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results: Overall, 128 (88%) patients rated MRE as very or fairly acceptable, lower than US (144, 99%; p<0.001), but greater than colonoscopy (60, 60%; p<0.001). MRE recovery time was longer than US (p<0.001), but shorter than colonoscopy (p<0.001). Patients were less willing to undergo MRE again than US (127 vs 133, 91% vs. 99%; p=0.012), but more willing than for colonoscopy (68, 75%; p=0.017). MRE generated greater burden than US (p<0.001), although burden scores were low. Younger age and emotional distress were associated with greater MRE and US burden. Higher MRE discomfort was associated with patient preference for US (p=0.053). Patients rated test accuracy as more important than scan discomfort. Conclusions.: MRE and US are well tolerated. Although MRE generates greater burden, longer recovery, and is less preferred than US, it is more acceptable than colonoscopy. Patients however place greater emphasis on diagnostic accuracy than burden.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    School: Birkbeck Schools and Departments > School of Science > Psychological Sciences
    Depositing User: Anne Miles
    Date Deposited: 03 Jul 2018 12:23
    Last Modified: 14 Dec 2019 16:42
    URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/22988

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