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    Synthesizing Nile crocodile Crocodylus niloticus attack data and historical context to inform mitigation efforts in South Africa and eSwatini (Swaziland)

    Pooley, Simon and Botha, H. and Combrink, X. and Powell, G. (2019) Synthesizing Nile crocodile Crocodylus niloticus attack data and historical context to inform mitigation efforts in South Africa and eSwatini (Swaziland). Oryx , ISSN 0030-6053. (In Press)

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    Abstract

    While damage-causing animals are a major challenge for conservation across Africa, and Nile crocodiles are allegedly responsible for more attacks on humans than any other species, data is lacking. This paper analyses 67 years of reported Nile crocodile attacks on humans in South Africa and eSwatini (1949-2016), identifying patterns in attack incidence in space and time, as well as victim demographics. Our literature review and archival searches identified records of 214 attacks. Most attacks occurred in natural water bodies, with attacks in dams increasing since 2000. Hotspots for attacks are identified. Most victims were attacked while swimming or bathing, followed by fishing, domestic chores, and crossing waterways. There was a significant relationship between gender and activity when attacked. Children (<16) account for 51% of all attacks, with a higher fatality rate compared to adults. Most victims were male (65%), with teenage boys the largest individual category. We conclude with recommendations for conservation policy and management to mitigate attacks by Nile crocodiles.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    Keyword(s) / Subject(s): Crocodile attacks, Nile crocodile, South Africa, eSwatini (Swaziland), conservation management
    School: Birkbeck Schools and Departments > School of Social Sciences, History and Philosophy > Department of Geography
    Depositing User: Simon Pooley
    Date Deposited: 15 Jan 2019 14:15
    Last Modified: 13 Jan 2020 21:03
    URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/23474

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