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    Tactile Distance Anisotropy on the palm: a meta-analysis

    Longo, Matthew R. (2020) Tactile Distance Anisotropy on the palm: a meta-analysis. Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics , ISSN 1943-3921. (In Press)

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    Abstract

    Illusions of the perceived distance between two touches on the skin have been studied since the classic work of Weber in the 19th century. For example, anisotropies of perceived tactile distance have been consistently found on several body parts, including the hand dorsum, the forearm, and the face. In each case, tactile distances oriented across body width are perceived as larger than those oriented along body length. Several studies have investigated tactile distance anisotropy on the glabrous skin of the palm of the hand, but have reached inconsistent conclusions, some studies finding no anisotropy and other finding an anisotropy analogous to that found on the dorsum. Given these inconsistencies, the aim of this study is to conduct a systematic meta-analysis of existing data regarding anisotropy on the palm. A total of 10 experiments were identified, which overall provided strong evidence for an anisotropy on the palm (Hedges g = 0.521) with distances aligned with hand width perceived as approximately 10% bigger than distances aligned with hand length. While this anisotropy is analogous to that found on the hand dorsum, it is substantially smaller in magnitude and the two biases appear to be uncorrelated. The present results show that, despite inconsistent results across studies, existing data indicates that there is an anisotropy of tactile distance on the palm of the hand.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    Additional Information: The final publication is available at Springer via the link above.
    School: Birkbeck Schools and Departments > School of Science > Psychological Sciences
    Depositing User: Matthew Longo
    Date Deposited: 02 Dec 2019 19:29
    Last Modified: 09 Jul 2020 16:59
    URI: http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/30119

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