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    Visual motion processing in migraine: enhanced motion after-effects are related to display contrast, visual symptoms, visual triggers and attack frequency

    Shepherd, Alex J. and Joly-Mascheroni, R.M. (2017) Visual motion processing in migraine: enhanced motion after-effects are related to display contrast, visual symptoms, visual triggers and attack frequency. Cephalalgia 37 (4), pp. 315-326. ISSN 0333-1024.

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    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Visual after-effects are illusions that occur after prolonged viewing of visual displays. The motion after-effect (MAE), for example, is an illusory impression of motion after viewing moving displays: subsequently, stationary displays appear to drift in the opposite direction. After-effects have been used extensively in basic vision research and in clinical settings, and are enhanced in migraine. OBJECTIVES: To assess associations between (1) MAE duration and visual symptoms experienced during/between migraine/headache attacks, and (2) visual stimuli reported as migraine/headache triggers. METHODS: The MAE was elicited after viewing motion for 45 seconds. MAE duration was tested for three test contrast displays (high, medium, low). Participants also completed a headache questionnaire that included migraine/headache triggers. RESULTS: For each test contrast, the MAE was prolonged in migraine. MAE duration was associated with photophobia; visual triggers (flicker, striped patterns); and migraine or headache frequency. CONCLUSIONS: Group differences on various visual tasks have been attributed to abnormal cortical processing in migraine, such as hyperexcitability, heightened responsiveness and/or a lack of intra-cortical inhibition. The results are not consistent with hyperexcitability simply from a general lack of inhibition. Alternative multi-stage models are discussed and suggestions for further research are recommended, including visual tests in clinical assessments/clinical trials.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    Keyword(s) / Subject(s): migraine, adaptation, motion perception, motion after-effect, contrast, visual perception, cortical processing, visual triggers, flicker, stripes, photophobia
    School: School of Science > Psychological Sciences
    Depositing User: Administrator
    Date Deposited: 25 Apr 2016 06:57
    Last Modified: 28 Jun 2020 04:38
    URI: https://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/14520

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