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    Task inhibition, conflict, and the n-2 repetition cost: A combined computational and empirical approach

    Sexton, Nicholas J. and Cooper, Richard P. (2017) Task inhibition, conflict, and the n-2 repetition cost: A combined computational and empirical approach. Cognitive Psychology 94 , pp. 1-25. ISSN 0010-0285.

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    Abstract

    Task inhibition (also known as backward inhibition) is an hypothesised form of cognitive inhibition evident in multi-task situations, with the role of facilitating switching between multiple, competing tasks. This article presents a novel cognitive computational model of a backward inhibition mechanism. By combining aspects of previous cognitive models in task switching and conflict monitoring, the model instantiates the theoretical proposal that backward inhibition is the direct result of conflict between multiple task representations. In a first simulation, we demonstrate that the model produces two effects widely observed in the empirical literature, specifically, reaction time costs for both (n-1) task switches and n-2 task repeats. Through a systematic search of parameter space, we demonstrate that these effects are a general property of the model's theoretical content, and not specific parameter settings. We further demonstrate that the model captures previously reported empirical effects of inter-trial interval on n-2 switch costs. A final simulation extends the paradigm of switching between tasks of asymmetric difficulty to three tasks, and generates novel predictions for n-2 repetition costs. Specifically, the model predicts that n-2 repetition costs associated with hard-easy-hard alternations are greater than for easy-hard-easy alternations. Finally, we report two behavioural experiments testing this hypothesis, with results consistent with the model predictions.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    Additional Information: Nicholas J. Sexton was supported by an ESRC studentship. This work was completed as part of his PhD, under the supervision of Richard P. Cooper.
    School: School of Science > Psychological Sciences
    Research Centres and Institutes: Cognition, Computation and Modelling, Centre for
    Depositing User: Rick Cooper
    Date Deposited: 17 Jan 2017 16:27
    Last Modified: 24 Oct 2020 05:27
    URI: https://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/17947

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    • Task inhibition, conflict, and the n-2 repetition cost: A combined computational and empirical approach. (deposited 17 Jan 2017 16:27) [Currently Displayed]

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