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    'Which men?' How an intersectional perspective on men and masculinities helps explain women's political under-representation

    Childs, Sarah and Hughes, M. (2018) 'Which men?' How an intersectional perspective on men and masculinities helps explain women's political under-representation. Politics and Gender , ISSN 1743-923X. (In Press)

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    Abstract

    Progress towards gender equality in politics is striking. With the help of electoral gender quotas in 130+ countries, women’s national legislative representation more than doubled in the last 20 years. Other historically marginalized groups – racial, ethnic, and religious minorities, immigrants, and indigenous peoples – are also increasingly making their way into our parliaments. Political institutions are, then, more inclusive today than they have ever been. Yet, equal representation has not been fully realized: some marginalized groups have seen a decline, and men from dominant social and economic groups – hereafter ‘elite men’ – remain numerically dominant. Indeed, as of January 2014, there were no known countries where elite men did not hold a disproportionately high share of positions in national elective office (Hughes 2015).

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    School: School of Social Sciences, History and Philosophy > Politics
    Research Centres and Institutes: British Politics and Public Life, Centre for
    Depositing User: Sarah Childs
    Date Deposited: 10 Jan 2018 17:06
    Last Modified: 09 Feb 2021 21:36
    URI: https://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/20794

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