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    Event-related electroencephalographic lateralizations mark individual differences in spatial and nonspatial visual selection

    Wiegand, I. and Napiórkowski, N. and Töllner, T. and Petersen, A. and Habekost, T. and Muller, Hermann J. and Finke, K. (2018) Event-related electroencephalographic lateralizations mark individual differences in spatial and nonspatial visual selection. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 26 (3), pp. 194-198. ISSN 0898-929X.

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    Event-related EEG lateralizations mark individual differences in spatial and non-spatial visual selection _Wiegand_JOCN_final.pdf - Author's Accepted Manuscript

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    Abstract

    Selective attention controls the distribution of our visual sys- tem's limited processing resources to stimuli in the visual field. Two independent parameters of visual selection can be quantified by modeling an individual's performance in a partial-report task based on the computational theory of visual attention (TVA): (i) top-down control α, the relative attentional weight- ing of relevant over irrelevant stimuli, and (ii) spatial bias wλ, the relative attentional weighting of stimuli in the left versus right hemifield. In this study, we found that visual event-related electroencephalographic lateralizations marked interindividual differences in these two functions. First, individuals with better top-down control showed higher amplitudes of the posterior contralateral negativity than individuals with poorer top-down control. Second, differences in spatial bias were reflected in asymmetries in earlier visual event-related lateralizations de- pending on the hemifield position of targets; specifically, individuals showed a positivity contralateral to targets presented in their prioritized hemifield and a negativity contralateral to targets presented in their nonprioritized hemifield. Thus, our findings demonstrate that two functionally different aspects of attentional weighting quantified in the respective TVA parameters are reflected in two different neurophysiological measures: The observer-dependent spatial bias influences selection by a bottom-up processing advantage of stimuli appearing in the prioritized hemifield. By contrast, task-related target selection governed by top-down control involves active enhancement of target, and/or suppression of distractor, processing. These results confirm basic assumptions of the TVA framework, complement the functional interpretation of event-related lateralization components in selective attention studies, and are of relevance for the development of neurocognitive attentional assessment procedures.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    School: School of Science > Psychological Sciences
    Depositing User: Hermann Muller
    Date Deposited: 15 Mar 2018 14:45
    Last Modified: 11 Feb 2021 06:18
    URI: https://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/21583

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