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    Product diversification in Indian manufacturing

    Boehm, J. and Dhingra, S. and Morrow, John (2018) Product diversification in Indian manufacturing. In: Kohler, W. and Yalcin, E. (eds.) Developments in Global Sourcing. CESifo Seminar Series. Cambridge, U.S.: MIT Press, pp. 337-350. ISBN 9780262037570.

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    Abstract

    The presence of global value chains challenges the neoclassical idea of the firm since it implies firms are not monolithic but are rather interdependent on the larger economic environment. Examining establishments, the smallest units of production within firms, sheds light on the microeconomic incentives determining the location of production and whether a firm produces a good or sources it. Most work on multiproduct firms looks at developed countries, but constraints on firm growth are greater in developing economies. We examine multiproduct establishments in India during a high growth period. Multiproduct establishments made up the bulk of manufacturing production, and their product turnover contributed 28 per cent to net sales growth. Unlike the nineties which witnessed drastic liberalization, establishments in the two-thousands dropped products at rates similar to those for the US. Sales dispersion across products also predicts product addition.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Book Section
    Additional Information: Book synopsis: Theoretical and empirical perspectives on the fragmentation of production processes across borders, shedding light on global sourcing decisions and their economic effects. Recent decades have seen a fragmentation of production processes across borders, as firms find it increasingly profitable to organize production on a global scale. This fragmentation occurs across national borders as well as across firm boundaries; companies must decide not only the location of production but also how much control to exert over the different production stages. Economists have responded to this shift by developing new models of global sourcing, generating important insights into the driving forces and economic effects of this new form of globalization. Many questions, however, remain unanswered. This book tries to fill this gap. The contributors ask new questions or offer new modeling approaches to fragmentation of production, focusing in particular on time and uncertainty. They examine global sourcing in firms' multinationalization strategies, including offshoring, product scope, managerial incentives, supplier search, and contractual issues; and explore the interactions of global sourcing, exports, and economic development, investigating such topics as the complementarity of offshoring and exporting, product diversification, and the relationship between vertical linkages and development. Each chapter presents recent research that further develops existing models or documents new empirical patterns related to global sourcing.
    School: School of Business, Economics & Informatics > Economics, Mathematics and Statistics
    Depositing User: Administrator
    Date Deposited: 09 Apr 2018 09:56
    Last Modified: 29 Jun 2020 03:33
    URI: https://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/22043

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