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    Evaluation of prokaryote and eukaryote cells as food source for balamuthia mandrillaris

    Matin, A. and Jeong, S.R. and Faull, Jane and Rivas, A.O. and Khan, N. A. (2006) Evaluation of prokaryote and eukaryote cells as food source for balamuthia mandrillaris. Archives of Microbiology 186 (4), pp. 261-271. ISSN 0302-8933.

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    Abstract

    Balamuthia mandrillaris is a recently identified free-living protozoan pathogen that can cause fatal granulomatous encephalitis in humans. Recent studies have shown that B. mandrillaris consumes eukaryotic cells such as mammalian cell cultures as food source. Here, we studied B. mandrillaris interactions with various eukaryotic cells including, monkey kidney fibroblast-like cells (COS-7), human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and Acanthamoeba (an opportunistic protozoan pathogen) as well as prokaryotes, Escherichia coli. B. mandrillaris exhibited optimal growth on HBMEC compared with Cos-7 cells. In contrast, B. mandrillaris did not grow on bacteria but remained in the trophozoite stage. When incubated with Acanthamoeba trophozoites, B. mandrillaris produced partial Acanthamoeba damage and the remaining Acanthamoeba trophozoites underwent encystment. However, B. mandrillaris were unable to consume Acanthamoeba cysts. Next, we observed that B. mandrillaris-mediated Acanthamoeba encystment is a contact-dependent process that requires viable B. mandrillaris. In support, conditioned medium of B. mandrillaris did not stimulate Acanthamoeba encystment nor did lysates of B. mandrillaris. Overall, these studies suggest that B. mandrillaris target Acanthamoeba in the trophozoite stage; however, Acanthamoeba possess the ability to defend themselves by forming cysts, which are resistant to B. mandrillaris. Further studies will examine the mechanisms associated with food selectivity in B. mandrillaris.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    School: School of Science > Biological Sciences
    Depositing User: Sarah Hall
    Date Deposited: 13 May 2019 09:15
    Last Modified: 13 May 2019 09:15
    URI: https://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/27470

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