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    The unique contributions of verbal analogical reasoning and non-verbal matrix reasoning to science and maths problem-solving in adolescence

    Brookman-Byrne, Annie and Mareschal, Denis and Tolmie, Andrew K and Dumontheil, Iroise (2019) The unique contributions of verbal analogical reasoning and non-verbal matrix reasoning to science and maths problem-solving in adolescence. Mind, Brain, and Education 13 (3), pp. 211-223. ISSN 1751-2271.

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    Abstract

    Relational reasoning, the ability to detect meaningful patterns, matures through adolescence. The unique contributions of verbal analogical and non-verbal matrix relational reasoning to science and maths are not well understood. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data were collected during science and maths problem-solving, and participants (N=36, 11-15 years) also completed relational reasoning and executive function tasks. Higher verbal analogical reasoning associated with higher accuracy and faster reaction times in science and maths, and higher activation in the left anterior temporal cortex during maths problem-solving. Higher non-verbal matrix reasoning associated with higher science accuracy, higher science activation in regions across the brain, and lower maths activation in the right middle temporal gyrus. Science associations mostly remained significant when individual differences in executive functions and verbal IQ were taken into account, while maths associations typically did not. The findings indicate the potential importance of supporting relational reasoning in adolescent science and maths learning.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    Additional Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the article, which has been published in final form at the link above. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
    School: School of Science > Psychological Sciences
    Research Centres and Institutes: Brain and Cognitive Development, Centre for (CBCD), Educational Neuroscience, Centre for
    Depositing User: Iroise Dumontheil
    Date Deposited: 10 Jul 2019 18:33
    Last Modified: 22 Nov 2020 06:21
    URI: https://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/28074

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