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    Interpretive biases for one's own behavior and physiology in high-trait-anxious individuals and repressors

    Derakhshan, Nazanin and Eysenck, M.W. (1997) Interpretive biases for one's own behavior and physiology in high-trait-anxious individuals and repressors. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 73 (4), pp. 816-825. ISSN 0022-3514.

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    Abstract

    The experiments reported here were designed to test predictions from a cognitive theory of personality proposed by M. W. Eysenck (1997). According to that theory, many of the observed differences between individuals high in trait anxiety and repressors (individuals low in trait anxiety and high in social desirability) depend on underlying individual differences in cognitive biases. It follows from the theory that high-anxious individuals should have an interpretive bias for their own behavior in social situations, that is, they exaggerate how anxious it is. In contrast, repressors should have an opposite interpretive bias for their own behavior, that is, they underestimate how anxious it is. Evidence consistent with these predictions was obtained in Experiments 1 and 2. Implications of these findings for cognitive theories of personality are discussed.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    School: School of Science > Psychological Sciences
    Depositing User: Sarah Hall
    Date Deposited: 18 Nov 2019 09:43
    Last Modified: 18 Nov 2019 09:43
    URI: https://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/29973

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