BIROn - Birkbeck Institutional Research Online

    Does perceived direct gaze boost detection in adults and children with and without autism? The stare-in-the-crowd effect revisited

    Senju, Atsushi and Hasegawa, T. and Tojo, Y. (2005) Does perceived direct gaze boost detection in adults and children with and without autism? The stare-in-the-crowd effect revisited. Visual Cognition 12 (8), pp. 1474-1496. ISSN 1350-6285.

    Full text not available from this repository.

    Abstract

    This study extended that of von Grünau and Anston (1995) and explored whether perceived direct gaze is easily detected by individuals with and without autism, utilizing a visual-search paradigm. Participants detected target faces with either direct gaze or averted gaze. Laterally averted faces were used to eliminate the involvement of lower perceptual characteristics such as symmetry, which were inherent with the “straight gaze” used by von Grünau and Anston. Both typically developed adults and children detected targets with direct gaze more quickly than those with averted gaze, but face inversion distorted this asymmetrical performance, suggesting the contribution of configurative facial processing. In contrast, children with autism were not affected by the gaze direction presented by realistic facial stimuli. They were, however, faster to detect straight gaze defined solely by local features, which suggests that their impairment might be specific to the detection of direct gaze presented within a facial context.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    School: School of Science > Psychological Sciences
    Depositing User: Sarah Hall
    Date Deposited: 11 Feb 2020 10:31
    Last Modified: 11 Feb 2020 10:31
    URI: https://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/30910

    Statistics

    Downloads
    Activity Overview
    0Downloads
    77Hits

    Additional statistics are available via IRStats2.

    Archive Staff Only (login required)

    Edit/View Item Edit/View Item