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    Multisystemic therapy versus management as usual in the treatment of adolescent antisocial behaviour (START): 5-year follow-up of a pragmatic, randomised controlled, superiority trial

    Fonagy, P and Butler, S and Cottrell, D and Scott, S and Pilling, S. and Eisler, I. and Fuggle, P. and Kraam, A. and Byford, S. and Wason, J. and Smith, Jonathan A. and Anokhina, A. and Ellison, R. and Simes, E. and Ganguli, P. and Allison, E. and Goodyer, I.M. (2020) Multisystemic therapy versus management as usual in the treatment of adolescent antisocial behaviour (START): 5-year follow-up of a pragmatic, randomised controlled, superiority trial. The Lancet Psychiatry 7 (5), pp. 420-430. ISSN 2215-0366. (In Press)

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    Abstract

    Background: Multisystemic therapy is a manualised treatment programme for young people who exhibit antisocial behaviour. The Systemic Therapy for At Risk Teens trial is the first large-scale randomised controlled trial of multisystemic therapy in the UK. Previous findings reported to 18 months post-baseline did not indicate superiority of multisystemic therapy compared with management as usual. Here, we report outcomes of the trial to 60 months. Methods: Young people aged 11–17 years with moderate-to-severe antisocial behaviour were randomly allocated to management as usual (n=342) or 3–5 months of multisystemic therapy followed by management as usual (n=342). The primary outcome was proportion of offences with convictions in the groups. Findings: By 60 months’ follow-up, 55% of the multisystemic therapy group had at least one offence with a criminal conviction, compared with 53% of the management-as-usual group (odds ratio 1·13, 95% CI: 0·82, 1·56; p=0·44). Interpretation: The results of the 5-year follow-up show no evidence of longer-term superiority for multisystemic therapy compared with management as usual.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    School: School of Science > Psychological Sciences
    Depositing User: Jonathan Smith
    Date Deposited: 06 May 2020 10:54
    Last Modified: 13 Feb 2021 00:34
    URI: https://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/31853

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