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    Gender variability in e-learning utility essentials: evidence from a multi-generational higher education cohort

    Eshun Yawson, D. and Yamoah, Fred (2021) Gender variability in e-learning utility essentials: evidence from a multi-generational higher education cohort. Computers in Human Behavior 114 (106558), ISSN 0747-5632.

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    Abstract

    The paper reports a quantitative investigation into the nuances of gender perspectives of E-Learning utility across the social categorisations of Generation X, Y, and Z in the current phenomena of accelerated usage of e-learning in the emerging multi-generational undergraduate cohorts. Using multi-generational undergraduate cohorts (N = 611), taking a mandatory online course in a Business School curricular. With multi-group partial least-squares analysis, the study shows differences exist in the utility of e-learning within gender and Generations of X, Y, and Z. These differences may not be apparent when examined at only the gender level, which has led other researchers to conclude the gender gap is narrowing. However, we establish that within gender and across generations in a developing country context, the gender divide is not narrowing at the same pace as found in other developed countries. To accelerate the implementation of e-learning in traditional (faceto-face) undergraduate programmes globally, there is the need to contextualize Course Development, Learner Support, Assessment, and User Characteristics factors along with the different genders, and across generations to improve Results Demonstrability and Student Overall Satisfaction of utility of e-learning. In developing countries, there is a need to enhance Institutional factors to strengthen the drive to e-learning.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    School: School of Business, Economics & Informatics > Management
    Depositing User: Fred Yamoah
    Date Deposited: 10 Sep 2020 10:53
    Last Modified: 16 Feb 2021 00:32
    URI: https://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/40782

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