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    Centennial-scale lake-level lowstand at Lake Uddelermeer (The Netherlands) indicates changes in moisture source region prior to the 2.8-kyr event

    Engels, Stefan and Bakker, M. and Bohncke, S.J.P. and Cerli, C. and Hoek, W.Z. and Jansen, B. and Peters, T. and Renssen, H. and Sachse, D. and van Aken, J.M. and van den Bos, V. and van Geel, B. and van Oostrom, R. and Winkels, T. and Wolma, M. (2016) Centennial-scale lake-level lowstand at Lake Uddelermeer (The Netherlands) indicates changes in moisture source region prior to the 2.8-kyr event. The Holocene 26 (7), pp. 1075-1091. ISSN 0959-6836.

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    Abstract

    The Uddelermeer is a unique lake for The Netherlands, containing a sediment record that continuously registered environmental and climatic change from the late Pleistocene on to the present. A 15.6-m-long sediment record was retrieved from the deepest part of the sedimentary basin and an age–depth model was developed using radiocarbon dating, 210Pb dating, and Bayesian modeling. Lake-level change was reconstructed using a novel combination of high-resolution palaeoecological proxies (e.g. pollen, non-pollen palynomorphs, chironomids), quantitative determinations of lake-level change (ground-penetrating radar), and estimates of changes in precipitation (lipid biomarker stable isotopes). We conclude that lake levels were at least as high as present-day water levels from the late glacial to 3150 cal. yr BP, with the exception of at least one lake-level lowstand during the Preboreal period. Lake levels were ca. 2.5 m lower than at present between 3150 and 2800 cal. yr BP, which might have been the result of a change in moisture source region prior to the so-called 2.8-kyr event. Increasing precipitation amounts around 2800 cal. yr BP resulted in a lake-level rise of about 3.5–4 m to levels that were 1–1.5 m higher than at present, in line with increased precipitation levels as inferred for the 2.8-kyr event from nearby raised bog areas as well as with reconstructions of higher lake levels in the French Alps, all of which have been previously attributed to a phase of decreased solar activity. Lake levels decreased to their present level only during recent times, although the exact timing of the drop in lake levels is unclear.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    School: School of Social Sciences, History and Philosophy > Department of Geography
    Depositing User: Stefan Engels
    Date Deposited: 14 Jan 2021 14:51
    Last Modified: 14 Jan 2021 14:51
    URI: https://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/41774

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