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    Research portfolio: Monuments are not to be trusted

    Dzuverovic, Lina Research portfolio: Monuments are not to be trusted. UNSPECIFIED. (Unpublished)

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    Abstract

    In 2014 I was commissioned by Alex Farquharson, then Director of Nottingham Contemporary (current Director, Tate Britain) to present my research as an exhibition, conference, and accompanying events at the Nottingham Contemporary arts centre. I developed four strands for the exhibition ‘Monuments Should Not Be Trusted’ (Socialism and Class Difference; Comradess Superwoman; Public Space and The Presence of Tito; Utopian Consumerism and Subcultures) which took place between January and March 2016. With over 100 works and over 30 artists from the region of the former Yugoslavia this project remains the largest UK exhibition to date to showcase Yugoslav cultural outputs. By highlighting new and previously under-researched material the exhibition created new contexts and framings of cultural outputs from the region, generating new knowledge of Yugoslav practices as internationally relevant and important for the cultural history of the 20th Century; and by approaching the project thematically and placing the exhibited material in the international context of conceptual art, pop culture and the 1968 student protests, the exhibition embodied new ways of thinking about Yugoslav cultural outputs. The research involved several years’ field work in the region, gathering new material from artists’, museum and television archives, material culture artefacts and conducting over 20 audio interviews with cultural workers from across the region. The exhibition challenged the 2 totalitarian paradigm of reading Yugoslav art via binary political narratives of communism and capitalism. The research highlighted previously under-researched connections across artistic disciplines of visual and performing arts, pop music, television, and placed these works in an international context of global artistic movements, shedding a new light on Yugoslav art as internationally relevant and deeply connected to global cultural shifts of the period.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Other
    Additional Information: Constituent outputs can be found at http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/24988/ and http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/30183/
    Depositing User: Administrator
    Date Deposited: 16 Dec 2020 11:02
    Last Modified: 16 Dec 2020 11:02
    URI: https://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/42209

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