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    Investigating the differential effects of social networking site addiction and Internet gaming disorder on psychological health

    Pontes, Halley (2017) Investigating the differential effects of social networking site addiction and Internet gaming disorder on psychological health. Journal of Behavioral Addictions 6 (4), pp. 601-610. ISSN 2063-5303.

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    Abstract

    Background and aims: Previous studies focused on examining the interrelationships between social networking site (SNS) addiction and Internet gaming disorder (IGD) in isolation. Moreover, little is known about the potential simultaneous differential effects of SNS addiction and IGD on psychological health. This study investigated the interplay between these two technological addictions and ascertained how they can uniquely and distinctively contribute to increasing psychiatric distress when accounting for potential effects stemming from sociodemographic and technology-related variables. Methods: A sample of 509 adolescents (53.5% males) aged 10–18 years (mean = 13.02, SD = 1.64) were recruited. Results: It was found that key demographic variables can play a distinct role in explaining SNS addiction and IGD. Furthermore, it was found that SNS addiction and IGD can augment the symptoms of each other, and simultaneously contribute to deterioration of overall psychological health in a similar fashion, further highlighting potentially common etiological and clinical course between these two phenomena. Finally, the detrimental effects of IGD on psychological health were found to be slightly more pronounced than those produced by SNS addiction, a finding that warrants additional scientific scrutiny. Discussion and conclusion: The implications of these results are further discussed in light of the existing evidence and debates regarding the status of technological addictions as primary and secondary disorders.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    School: School of Business, Economics & Informatics > Organizational Psychology
    Depositing User: Administrator
    Date Deposited: 20 Apr 2021 14:10
    Last Modified: 09 Jun 2021 23:27
    URI: https://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/43458

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