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    Beyond the ‘Compensation Hypothesis’: framing behavioral addictions as primary disorders

    Pontes, Halley Beyond the ‘Compensation Hypothesis’: framing behavioral addictions as primary disorders. In: 5th International Conference on Behavioral Addictions (ICBA2018), 23–25 Apr 2018, Cologne, Germany. (Unpublished)

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    Abstract

    Background and Aims: The clinical status of behavioral addictions – especially technological addictions – remains controversial at best. Some researchers argue against their formal recognition because they can be conceptualized as secondary disorders (‘Compensation Hypothesis’). By contrast, other researchers favor their formal recognition as behavioral addictions can also be framed as primary disorders (‘Risk Hypothesis’). This study investigated whether behavioral addictions can be empirically framed as primary disorders. Methods: A total of 509 adolescents (53.5% male, mean age 13 years, SD = 1.6 years) were recruited. In addition to collecting sociodemographic data, information was collected on Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD) and Social Networking Site (SNS) Addiction. Results: Overall, both behavioral addictions augmented symptoms of each other, and at the same time contributed to deterioration of overall psychological health in a similar fashion, further corroborating the role of behavioral addictions as primary disorders (‘Risk Hypothesis’). Finally, IGD appeared to compromise psychological health slightly more in comparison to SNS addiction. Conclusions: Overall, it can be concluded that different types of behavioral addictions can share common etiology. Additionally, empirical evidence supporting the role of behavioral addictions as primary disorders capable of potentiating further psychiatric comorbidity was found, thus supporting the ‘Risk Hypothesis’ for behavioral addictions.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
    School: School of Business, Economics & Informatics > Organizational Psychology
    Depositing User: Administrator
    Date Deposited: 03 Jun 2021 13:40
    Last Modified: 03 Jun 2021 13:40
    URI: https://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/44585

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