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    Cognitive function and emotional vulnerability in metastatic breast cancer: moderating effects of age and social support

    Dobretsova, Anna and Derakhshan, Nazanin (2021) Cognitive function and emotional vulnerability in metastatic breast cancer: moderating effects of age and social support. Psycho-Oncology , ISSN 1099-1611.

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    Abstract

    Objective: Previous literature has established a relationship between cognitive function and symptoms of anxiety, depression, and post‐traumatic stress in primary breast cancer, but not in metastatic breast cancer (MBC). The current study examined the relationship between cognitive function and symptoms of anxiety, depression, and post‐traumatic stress as well as the moderating effects of age, time since MBC diagnosis, and social support. Methods: Subjective and objective measures of cognitive function as well as self‐ reports of emotional vulnerability were completed by 59 women diagnosed with MBC who were recruited through social media and support groups. Results: Emotional vulnerability scores were associated with perceived measures of cognitive function. Additionally, low levels of perceived cognitive function were met with increased levels of depression with social support moderating this relationship buffering against depression. Age was found to moderate the relationship between cognitive function and post‐traumatic stress with younger women at a greater risk of vulnerability. Out of all the emotional vulnerability measures, only anxiety negatively correlated with objective task performance. Conclusions: This study established a relationship between cognitive function and emotional vulnerability in MBC patients. It emphasised how vulnerable younger MBC women are to post‐traumatic stress, and the importance of the combined effects of cognitive function and social support in buffering against depression. Our results have important implications for developing new interventions and treatment plans that consider the roles of these factors in ensuring a better quality of life in MBC.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    Additional Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the article, which has been published in final form at the link above. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
    Keyword(s) / Subject(s): anxiety, cognitive function, depression, metastatic breast cancer, post‐traumatic stress, social support
    School: School of Science > Psychological Sciences
    Research Centres and Institutes: Building Resilience in Breast Cancer
    Depositing User: Naz Derakhshan
    Date Deposited: 06 Jul 2021 15:27
    Last Modified: 07 Jul 2021 05:49
    URI: https://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/44786

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