BIROn - Birkbeck Institutional Research Online

    The effects of basic psychological needs satisfaction and mindfulness on solicitors’ well-being

    Soon, Lucinda and Walsh, James and McDowall, Almuth and Teoh, Kevin (2021) The effects of basic psychological needs satisfaction and mindfulness on solicitors’ well-being. International Journal of the Legal Profession , ISSN 0969-5958.

    [img] Text
    47032.pdf - Author's Accepted Manuscript
    Restricted to Repository staff only until 26 June 2023.
    Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial.

    Download (462kB) | Request a copy

    Abstract

    Rising reports of poor mental health and well-being in lawyers across multiple jurisdictions, notably the United States of America, Australia, and the United Kingdom (UK), have led to a growing international focus on this topic. Yet there remains a paucity of empirical data on the well-being of solicitors practising in England and Wales. Framed by self-determination theory (SDT), we undertook a cross-sectional survey of 340 trainee and qualified solicitors in England and Wales to (1) benchmark the psychological well-being of solicitors against other UK occupational groups and adult population norms; and (2) test relationships between mindfulness, satisfaction of basic psychological needs (perceived autonomy, relatedness, and competence at work) and psychological well-being. The SDT components positively and significantly related to well-being. Mindfulness partially mediated the pathway between basic psychological needs satisfaction and well-being, suggesting that satisfaction of these needs may in themselves facilitate higher mindfulness, thereby contributing to greater levels of well-being. We conceive that autonomy, relatedness, and competence at work provide the psychological space necessary for mindfulness to be cultivated, within which well-being can thrive. These findings support the importance of a systemic approach to solicitors’ well-being to safeguard basic psychological needs in the workplace.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    Additional Information: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis, available online at the link above.
    School: School of Business, Economics & Informatics > Organizational Psychology
    Depositing User: Kevin Teoh
    Date Deposited: 04 Mar 2022 06:29
    Last Modified: 25 Mar 2022 18:13
    URI: https://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/47032

    Statistics

    Downloads
    Activity Overview
    1Download
    34Hits

    Additional statistics are available via IRStats2.

    Archive Staff Only (login required)

    Edit/View Item Edit/View Item