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    Genome-wide functional analysis reveals key roles for kinesins in the mammalian and mosquito stages of the malaria parasite life cycle

    Zeeshan, M. and Rashpa, R. and Ferguson, D.J.P. and Abel, S. and Chahine, Z. and Brady, D. and Vaughan, S. and Moores, Carolyn A. and Le Roch, K.G. and Brochet, M. and Holder, A.A. and Tewari, R. (2022) Genome-wide functional analysis reveals key roles for kinesins in the mammalian and mosquito stages of the malaria parasite life cycle. PLoS Biology 20 (7), e3001704. ISSN 1545-7885.

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    Abstract

    Kinesins are microtubule-based motors important in cell division, motility, polarity, and intracellular transport in many eukaryotes. However, they are poorly studied in the divergent eukaryotic pathogens- Plasmodium spp., the causative agents of malaria, which manifest atypical aspects of cell division and plasticity of morphology throughout the lifecycle in both mammalian and mosquito hosts. Here we describe a genome-wide screen of Plasmodium kinesins, revealing diverse subcellular locations and functions in spindle assembly, axoneme formation, and cell morphology. Surprisingly, only kinesin- 13 is essential for growth in the mammalian host while the other eight kinesins are required during the proliferative and invasive stages of parasite transmission through the mosquito vector. In-depth analyses of kinesin-13 and kinesin-20 revealed functions in microtubule dynamics during apical cell polarity formation, spindle assembly, and axoneme biogenesis. These findings help us to understand the importance of microtubule motors and may be exploited to discover new therapeutic interventions against malaria.

    Metadata

    Item Type: Article
    School: School of Science > Biological Sciences
    Depositing User: Administrator
    Date Deposited: 01 Aug 2022 05:12
    Last Modified: 02 Aug 2022 12:34
    URI: https://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/id/eprint/48280

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